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Social Security
Pension Income Estimated monthly pension at retirement

Your projected yearly retirement income needed: $0

Shortfall:$0
From Assets:$0
Pension:$0
Social Security:$0

Based on average market performance

How are you doing with your current plan?

Income projections within retirement are based on a moderate risk tolerance strategy. Choosing a conservative or aggressive investment strategy could lead to different results.

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Variable annuities are offered by prospectus only which contains information about the contract's features, risks, charges and expenses. The investment objectives, risks and policies of the investment options, as well as other information about the investment options, are described in their respective prospectuses. You should read the prospectuses and consider the information carefully before investing.

Like most annuity contracts, MetLife annuities have limitations, exclusions, charges, termination provisions and terms for keeping them in force. All product guarantees, including optional benefits, are subject to the claims-paying ability and financial strength of the issuing insurance company. Please contact your Financial Professional for complete details.

Pursuant to IRS Circular 230, MetLife is providing you with the following notification: The information contained in this document is not intended to (and cannot) be used by anyone to avoid IRS penalties. This document supports the promotion and marketing of insurance products. You should seek advice based on your particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor.

MetLife, its agents, and representatives may not give legal or tax advice. Any discussion of taxes herein or related to this document is for general information purposes only and does not purport to be complete or cover every situation. Tax law is subject to interpretation and legislative change. Tax results and the appropriateness of any product for any specific taxpayer may vary depending on the facts and circumstances. You should consult with and rely on your own independent legal and tax advisors regarding your particular set of facts and circumstances.

Variable annuities, other than Preference Premier®, are issued by MetLife Investors Insurance Company on Policy Form Series 7150 (12/00), MetLife Investors USA Insurance Company on Policy Form Series 8010 (11/00); both at 5 Park Plaza, Suite 1900, Irvine, CA 92614 and in New York, only by First MetLife Investors Insurance Company on Policy Form Series 6010 (02/02) and 4506 (06/02); 200 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10166. The Preference Premier variable annuity is issued by Metropolitan Life Insurance Company on Policy Form Series PPS (07/01); 200 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10166 and is offered through MetLife Securities, Inc. and New England Securities Corporation; both at 1095 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10036. All variable products are distributed by MetLife Investors Distribution Company; 5 Park Plaza, Suite 1900, Irvine, CA 92614. All are MetLife companies.

Single premium deferred fixed annuities are issued by MetLife Investors USA Insurance Company on Policy Form Series 8210 (01/02); 5 Park Plaza, Suite 1900, Irvine, CA 92614 and in New York, only by First MetLife Investors Insurance Company on Policy Form Series 6210 (01/02); 200 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10166 (collectively and singly, MetLife Investors).

The MAX Income Single Premium Immediate Annuity is issued by Metropolitan Life Insurance Company on Policy Form No. ML-SPIA (07/06); 200 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10166 and the Single Premium Immediate Annuity is issued by MetLife Investors USA Insurance Company on Policy Form Series MLIU-SPIA (07/06); 5 Park Plaza, Suite 1900, Irvine, CA 92614 and in New York, only by First MetLife Investors Insurance Company on Policy Form Series FMLI-SPIA (07/06); 200 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10166.

• Not A Deposit • Not FDIC-Insured • Not Insured By Any Federal Government Agency
• Not Guaranteed By Any Bank Or Credit Union • May Go Down In Value

Final thought: People's expectations for their retirement are high because now there are more strategies to make the most of what you have.

Annuities may be a valuable addition to your overall retirement income plan.

Glossary

Aggressive*

If you are an aggressive investor, you are more willing to accept market swings. You seek a higher potential return from your investments. While this "winner-takes-all" attitude may hold the potential for greater gain, it also holds the potential for greater loss. This type of aggressive investing is only for the truly aggressive investor and is best suited for long-term financial goals.

Amount Saved

Includes all funds available such as 401(k) or 403(b) accounts, stocks and bonds, IRAs, and bank accounts.

Annual Income

The amount you (or if applicable, your partner) earned this year from taxable salary.

Conservative

If you're a conservative investor, you are likely not comfortable with the idea of losing any of your principal, the initial amount of money invested. You may prefer to put your money in fixed-return investment vehicles that guarantee return of principal plus interest. Savings accounts and certificates of deposit (CDs) that are generally insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) for up to $250,000 are examples. Be aware, however, that the rate of return may not outpace inflation, so there is still risk — inflation risk, or the risk of losing earning power.

Moderate*

If you are a moderate investor, you don't want to lose your principal but you also realize that in order to receive higher returns you generally have to assume some risk. You may be comfortable with a combination of low- and higher-risk investments. While you may flinch when the market drops, you understand that the potential for higher long-term gain may mean having to ride out the dips.

Pension

The monthly pension you expect to receive at retirement.

Social Security

You may estimate your Social Security benefit at retirement or enter the amount from your Social Security benefit statement. Use the 'full retirement age' amount.

If you wish to enter Social Security for yourself and your spouse, select 'Enter' and include the amount of combined benefits.

If you do not wish to include Social Security in this calculation, select 'Enter' with $0 as the benefit amount.

Yearly Savings

The amount of money you are saving this year for retirement. New contributions are assumed to increase every year.

* May be more appropriate for long-term investors.

Assumptions

These calculators do not provide comprehensive financial planning and should not be relied upon as your sole or primary means for making retirement planning decisions. You should discuss your situation with your financial planner, tax adviser, or an estate planning professional to identify specific issues that have not been addressed. Further, it is important that you periodically monitor your retirement income strategy throughout your retirement. It is recommended that you revisit the calculator periodically, as your results will change over time as your circumstances and/or your goals change.

After you've gone through the tools, MetLife can help you think through all the issues.


Retirement Income Snapshot Tool

The MetLife Retirement Income Snapshot tool provides a method of analyzing your retirement income goals. Planning for your retirement income would be easy if you could depend on earning the same amount year after year from your assets and you knew how long your retirement was going to be. You would know exactly how much you could afford to withdraw and would never have to deal with any uncertainties. Real-life planning is obviously far more difficult.

Uncertainty of Investment Rates of Return

First of all, you have to account for unknown and unpredictable variations in annual investment rates of return. The timing of the market's ups and downs is particularly important. To illustrate this point, let's assume you have $1000 to invest and you will earn 10% every year. Using this estimate, by the end of the first year you will have $1100 ($1000 times 110%), and by the end of the second year you will have $1210 ($1100 times 110%). But what happens if instead you lose 5% in the first year, and gain 25% in the second year? That is still an average rate of return of 10%, but consider the difference in your finances: by the end of the first year you only have $950 ($1000 times 95%) and by the end of the second year you have $1187.50. The average return was the same in both cases, but the actual returns, and their timing, resulted in different financial results. Multiply these results by dozens of years and tens of thousands of dollars, and you will see how the differences can add up.

Uncertainty of Life Expectancy

A second uncertainty is life expectancy, or in other words, how long your retirement (as well as your partner's retirement, if applicable) is going to be. MetLife's studies show that many people do not understand what life expectancy figures mean. They tend to underestimate how long they will live and thus how long their retirement is likely to be.1 Are you aware of the following? The average 65-year-old male has a 50% chance of living to age 85 and a 25% chance of living to age 92. The numbers are slightly higher for the average 65-year-old female. Together, the average 65-year-old couple has a 50% chance of at least one person living to age 92 and a 25% chance of at least one person living to age 97.2 Many people do not fully understand the realities of these statistics. Consequently, they fail to recognize a potentially large retirement income risk.

Monte Carlo Simulations

The calculator uses a methodology called the Monte Carlo Simulation technique. This method gives you a more realistic assessment of how the future may unfold by looking at a wide variety of potential market scenarios that take fluctuating market returns into account. The calculator runs two simulations. The first simulation will perform calculations from the current date up until your planned retirement age and the second simulation will perform calculations from your retirement age and throughout your retirement. Instead of basing the calculations on just one average rate of return for a certain time period, the calculator generates 500 computer simulations of what may happen to your assets in the real world until your retirement age, as well as throughout your retirement. The result also estimates the range of possible financial outcome you may have achieved upon the time of your retirement, as well as throughout your retirement.

Each Monte Carlo simulation in this calculator includes a unique combination and sequence of good and bad years with various intensities. The simulations track the behavior of your portfolio and monthly withdrawal amount over various retirement periods until the age at retirement. The amount of your yearly savings is adjusted each year to account for increase in salary. The calculator then ranks all 500 simulations by the amount of asset at retirement, and records the results from the 25th, 250th, and 475th cases, to illustrate the range of possible outcomes at the end of our reference timeframe. These three scenarios are referred to as the "below average", the "expected", and the "above average" scenarios. Then those interim outcomes are mathematically transformed from asset units into income units. They are ultimately reported in terms of the annual inflation-adjusted income that can be withdrawn from those assets at retirement outcomes with a 95% confidence that such withdrawal can be sustained throughout the person's lifetime. (Ref: Converting Assets to Income section below)

Pre-retirement Investment Component

The calculations are based on the portfolio(s) you selected for yourself (and your partner) in the asset allocation input fields. These model portfolios were developed according to the principles of Modern Portfolio Theory. The theory has proven useful by mathematically redefining risk in order to achieve more effective diversification among different asset classes. Please keep in mind that we have not validated whether the asset allocation you selected is appropriate for you (and your partner) based on your (and your partner's) investment objectives, attitudes toward risk and investment time horizon.

The model portfolios used by the calculators offers different degrees of risk and reward based on the types of assets they contain. Portfolios with a higher percentage of stocks have historically been more volatile (made sharper price moves over the short term), but have also offered the greatest return potential in the long run. Portfolios with higher percentages of bonds and short-term securities usually offer more price stability and less chance of losing your principal. These portfolios have historically offered lower returns than those with higher concentrations of stocks.

In theory, the most efficiently diversified portfolio consists of many asset classes: stocks, bonds, real estate, foreign investments, commodities, precious metals and currencies, among others. Since few investors can reasonably be expected to own such a comprehensive array of assets, we sought to generalize Modern Portfolio Theory into the three primary asset classes: stocks, bonds and cash. Here are the model portfolio's asset allocations.

StocksBondsCash
Conservative:40%40%20%
Moderate:60%30%10%
Aggressive:80%20%0%

The combination of scenarios for each portfolio is developed by an analysis of Ibbotson historical data, including standard deviations and correlations of market indices representative of the asset classes to produce a distribution of returns indicative of each model portfolio. Stock analysis is based on the S&P Composite Index. Bond analysis is based on the Salomon Long-Term High Grade Corporate Bond Index. Cash is credited with an annual rate of return of 3%. Each scenario tests random rates of return that include both likely market behavior as well as extreme events that are possible but not expected to occur very often. You cannot invest directly in an index.

Please keep in mind that MetLife makes available to customers a variety of asset allocation models and related information. Such models may differ in numerous ways, with some differences being substantial.

Life Expectancy Component

The life expectancy of you (and your partner) operates under the same Monte Carlo methodology and the results are built into the "Will Your Savings last Your Lifetime?" calculator to determine whether your desired income is sustainable over the course of your retirement. The randomized combination of scenarios for each individual's life expectancy is developed by an analysis of the Society of Actuaries' Annuity 2000 Mortality Table.

To illustrate the impact of variable life expectancies in conjunction with variable investment returns within the same set of simulations, consider the following: one scenario could be a success if you (and your partner) have a relatively short retirement period, even if the investment returns for that particular scenario were relatively poor. Another scenario could be a failure if you (and your partner) have a relatively long retirement period, even if the investment returns for that particular scenario were relatively strong.

In addition, it's important to understand that your simulation success rate will not be directly correlated with how aggressive or conservative your portfolio is. For example, a conservative portfolio may offer you the highest simulation success rate to achieve a given monthly withdrawal amount if you have a relatively short retirement period where inflation is not much of a threat. In contrast, if you anticipate a lengthy retirement of 20 years or more, a more aggressive portfolio may result in the highest simulation success rate for the same amount of initial income. While you need to feel comfortable with your portfolio in retirement, you should remember that the risk of running out of money is an important variable to consider along with the risk of investment loss.

Additional Assumptions

Tax considerations are not included in these calculators. The monthly income withdrawn represents pretax income. We also assume no early withdrawal penalties if you begin taking distributions prior to age 59½.

All of your assets are treated as if they were held in tax-deferred accounts. Expenses have been deducted from each simulated performance based on the expense ratios of the comparable Lipper no-load mutual fund category. This category includes funds that hold different combinations of asset classes (e.g., stocks, bonds and cash or cash equivalents).

Any rate of inflation is a constant 2.5%. This inflation rate is not factored into the annual returns, but used to inflate the projected amounts withdrawn annually from your retirement assets.

All dividends and interest are reinvested

The portfolios are rebalanced at the start of every year. Transaction costs related to rebalancing are not taken into account but if they were, your portfolio's performance would be lower. New contributions to retirement accounts increase 3.6% per year. This reflects the fact that salaries, on average, grow faster than inflation3.

Limitations

Limitations of this calculator include but are not limited to:

Although built into the methodology, the returns associated with market extremes may occur more frequently than projected.

The model portfolios and potential simulations for each are based on the three primary asset classes: stocks, bonds and cash. Your actual asset allocation may contain certain percentages of sub-asset classes within each asset class (for example: large cap stocks, small cap stocks, etc.) and the market behavior of these combinations will be different from the ones represented here.

Other investments not considered may have characteristics similar or superior to those being analyzed.

The calculation does not take into account an individual's federal, state and local tax situation which will impact the actual amount an individual will have available for use.

IMPORTANT: The projections or other information generated by this MetLife calculator regarding the likelihood of various investment outcomes are hypothetical in nature, do not reflect actual investment results, are not guarantees of future results, and do not reflect taxes that may be incurred. In addition, results may vary with each use over time. These projections are based in large part on the information that you have supplied. The accuracy of such information is critical to this analysis and MetLife will not verify it independently.

1MetLife MatureMarket Institute Retirement Income IQ Test, October 2011

2Social Security Period Life Table, 2000

32011 OASDI Trustees Report, SSA

What is Your Life Expectancy?

An essential element of retirement income planning is life expectancy, or in other words, how long your retirement is going to be. Unfortunately, MetLife's studies show that many people do not understand what life expectancy figures mean. They tend to underestimate how long they will live and thus how long their retirement is likely to be.1 Are you aware of the following: the average 65-year-old male has a 50% chance of living to age 85 and a 25% chance of living to age 92? The numbers are slightly higher for the average 65-year-old female. Together, the average 65-year-old couple has a 50% chance of at least one person living to age 92 and a 25% chance of at least one person living to age 97.2 Many people do not fully understand the realities of these statistics. Consequently, they fail to recognize a potentially large retirement income risk.

The results of this calculator are developed by an analysis of the Social Security Period Life Table, 2000, modified based on your individual health characteristics. The methodology assigns certain values to a number of factors including current age, gender and health. The calculator accumulates these modified rates over time to determine the likelihood of living to particular ages. The process is repeated for your partner, if applicable. The end result is an estimate of the likelihood of you or your partner living to a particular age. This information will assist you in determining whether your desired income is sustainable over the course of your retirement.

1MetLife MatureMarket Institute Retirement Income IQ Test, October 2011

2Social Security Period Life Table, 2000

Estimated Expenses in Retirement

Expenses in the first year of retirement is determined by using the replacement ratio concept. The replacement ratio expresses your expense as a percentage of your final salary. Depending on the final income level, the average replacement ratio in current retirees ranges between 75%-89%. (Aon/Georgia State Univ. Replacement Ratio Study 2008) In this calculator we assumed 60%*. Expenses in subsequent years are increased according to the inflation assumption.

* This is based on a calculation using the % of pre-retirement income to maintain standard of living in 2008 according to Aon Consulting, "Replacement Ratio Study", page 6, "Replacement Ratio from the Current and Prior Studies" in conjunction with the % of total spending in retirement for basic expenses according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics 2010 Consumer Expenditure Survey (released Sept. 2011).

Salary / New contribution (yearly savings) growth

Salary and new contributions to retirement accounts increase 3.6% per year. This reflects the fact that salaries, on average, grow faster than inflation3. This also implicitly assumes that your yearly savings will comprise a constant percentage of your salary throughout your career.

Social Security Benefit

The Social Security benefit is based on the information you provided. The approximate average Social Security benefit for a retired couple is $1,907 per month in today's dollars. (Source: ssa.gov, 2011)

Converting Assets to Income

The percentage of assets at retirement that can be withdrawn as annual income in a sustainable manner for as long as the person(s) lives is calculated using the post-retirement Monte Carlo simulation module ("Module"). Inputs are fed into that Module, with the additional assumption that assets follow the moderate allocation after retirement. Choosing a conservative or aggressive investment strategy could lead to different results. The income output corresponds to the expense that would cause the success rate output of the Module to be 95%.

How much do I need to cover essential expenses?

Experts say you'll need around 60% of what you're making (pre-tax) just before you retire for daily living expenses*. However, this can vary considerably based on lifestyle choices and healthcare needs.

* This is based on a calculation using the % of pre-retirement income to maintain standard of living in 2008 according to Aon Consulting, "Replacement Ratio Study", page 6, "Replacement Ratio from the Current and Prior Studies" in conjunction with the % of total spending in retirement for basic expenses according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics 2010 Consumer Expenditure Survey (released Sept. 2011).

What expenses are considered "daily living expenses"?

Those are necessities like housing, food, clothing, transportation and healthcare. You may want to consider covering these with income you can rely on for as long as you live.

From Assets

Annual income you can withdraw from your retirement savings with a 95% probability the income continues for your lifetime. The percentage withdrawn depends on your retirement age.

Shortfall

Shortfall is the amount of your projected yearly retirement income needed not filled by Social Security, pension and withdrawals from assets.

Pension

The portion of annual income from pension is the monthly pension you entered expressed as an annual income. This value is then discounted by the historical inflation rate to express this value in "today's dollars".

Social Security

The portion of annual income from Social Security is the value you chose to estimate or enter, expressed as an annual income in "today's dollars".

Your projected yearly retirement income needed is based on a 60% replacement of your projected earnings at retirement. Your annual income is assumed to increase by a factor slightly larger than the historical inflation rate. The value shown is in "today's dollars".

1Source: 2004 Retirement Confidence Survey, Employee Benefit Research Institute

2Source: Replacement Ratio Study - AON Consulting/Georgia State University, 2008